Sites monitored by CREMA

The Rescue Centre for Endangered Marine Species (CREMA by its Spanish acronym) started a nesting beach monitoring program at southern Nicoya Peninsula (SNP) in 2015. Today, CREMA, together with Turtle Trax S.A supervise four nesting beaches at SNP, which are, from southeast to northeast: Costa de Oro (2012-2021), San Miguel (1998-2021), Bejuco (2016-2021), and Corozalito (2008-2021). These projects are carried out to help and support the coastal communities that protect sea turtle nests, which were heavily poached in this area in 1997 (Viejobueno et al. 2011).

Four species of marine turtles nest in SNP: olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea), green (Chelonia mydas), leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea), and hawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) (Viejobueno et al. 2011). The most common and abundant turtle in the Eastern Pacific is the olive ridley; this species is currently vulnerable according to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) red list (Abreu-Grobois & Plotkin 2008). Olive ridleys have been extensively studied; however, several aspects of their biology are still unknown, such as their complex reproductive strategies.

The main objectives of this program are

  • Monitor the status of the population of sea turtles nesting at the beaches of the Southern Nicoya Peninsula.

         Nighttime Patrolling Photo by Josué López

  • Determine threats to the survival of female turtles and their nests.
  • These projects are carried out to help and support the coastal communities that protect sea turtle nests, which were heavily poached in this area in 1997 (Viejobueno et al. 2011).​
  • Protect sea turtle nests from poaching and predation by relocating them into the hatchery.
  • Evaluate the hatching and emerging success of sea turtle nests both at the beach and at the hatchery.
  • Reduce illegal poaching of sea turtle eggs.
  • Detect mass nesting events (Arribadas) of olive ridley turtles, and quantify their size in Corozalito beach.
  • Educate the public about the conservation issues facing sea turtles and the marine wildlife.

For more information about interships, volunteer work, or how to collaborate or participate, send an e-mail to the following addresses: info@cremacr.org, drojas@cremacr.org, o ninive.espinoza@cremacr.org.