CREMA Association is pleased to share the report of the first quarter, with the sighting data of the Olive Ridley Sea Turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea), in the south of the province of Guanacaste.

These are the turtles sighted in San Miguel Beach, Bejuco Beach, Costa de Oro Beach and Corozalito Beach between the months of June to August, 2018.

About the South Pacific monitored nesting beaches

Turtle Trax Map

San Miguel

San Miguel Turtle

San Miguel is a small beach town on the Pacific side of Costa Rica’s southern Nicoyan Peninsula. We have been investigating the nesting activity of marine turtles on this beach since 1998 after the town’s local community asked for help monitoring and protecting the nesting marine turtles. We employ 2 locals who help us to monitor the nesting activity on this beach. The beach is primarily an olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) sea turtle nesting beach, but eastern Pacific green (Chelonia mydas), leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea), and hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata) nesting events also occasionally occur.  So far, volunteers have protected 2618 nests and released 129,529 baby turtles.

Costa de Oro

CDO beach

Costa de Oro is a small beach town on the Pacific side of Costa Rica’s southern Nicoyan Peninsula. The project station house is on a beach-front property in the middle of the town. Costa de Oro is the newest of our four sea turtle beach conservation projects, and has been in operation since the 2012 season.  The beach is primarily an olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) sea turtle nesting beach, but eastern Pacific green (Chelonia mydas), leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea), and hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata) nesting events also occasionally occur.

Corozalito

CZ Beach Turtle

Playa Corozalito an undeveloped beach on the Pacific side of Costa Rica’s southern Nicoyan Peninsula. The project station house is situated in the town of Corozalito, which is a 30 minute walk from the beach. We began monitoring this site in August 2008 in response to the local community’s reports of frequent sea turtle nesting events. Since then, the organization has recorded high levels of nesting activity of olive ridleys (Lepidochelys olivacea), and sporadic nesting of Pacific green (Chelonia mydas) turtles. In addition, once a year Corozalito has a massive nesting event over a couple of nights that has the characteristics of extremely rare “arribadas,” a synchronized nesting phenomenon.

Images cortesy of TurtleTrax